Book Review: The Rogue and the Peasant by Amberley Martin

About the Book:

Title: The Rogue and the Peasant

Author: Amberley Martin

Page Length: 320

Publication Date: Feb. 1, 2022

Publisher: Caveline Press

Synopsis: Everyone knows a girl locked in a tower is supposed to wait for a prince-but that isn’t the destiny this girl has in mind.

Esme’s life has been filled with secrets. Her mother says she’s destined to be a queen, but she won’t say when. Or how. Or who Esme’s father is.

When Esme’s imprisoned by the evil fairy godmother, she only has more questions. Who is the young man guarding her? Why is he so interested in her father’s identity? And can she convince him to help her escape before she’s forced to marry whichever self-absorbed prince with a hero complex turns up to rescue her?

Since his father’s murder, Rory’s life has depended on keeping his identity secret. Working for the fairy godmother seems like a fair trade for his safety, until he’s sent to kidnap a girl who wears his family ring, a girl his father’s ghost is suspiciously quiet about.

Unraveling their connection might do more than save them both from the fairy godmother. It might save the fate of an entire queendom.

But can Esme achieve her destiny when Rory’s trying to avoid his own?

The Rogue and the Peasant is a fun, fairytale adventure that blends Hamlet with Rapunzel to make something completely new. 

LINKS:   Goodreads   |   Amazon  |

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, including Amazon, and I may earn a small commission, at no cost to you, if you purchase through my links.


My Review:

The Rogue and the Peasant is a fun, fairy tale-esque fantasy and the first book in The Fairy Godmother Tales. With hints of Cinderella, Rapunzel, and more, the story begins as Esme is taken to finishing school to prepare to become a queen. Of humble origins, Esme never expected this to be her path in life, and when she is kidnapped, she realizes that her journey is only just beginning.

Working for the manipulative fairy godmother, Rory is tasked with kidnapping Esme. He is determined to keep his identity a secret, but a unique connection between him and Esme threatens to expose everything. With his father’s ever-fading ghost as an almost constant companion, Rory must face his past as well as his complicated present if he ever wants to find peace and happiness in his future.

I enjoyed this story. It is a fun and quick adventure with great fairy tale elements. Magic, special connections to animals, goblin kings, hidden towers, giants, magical creatures, and more contribute to the fairy tale feel of the story. It is an easy and well-paced read, and, like most fairy tales, there are a lot of great messages in this story. Freedom, identity, forgiveness, and knowing one’s worth regardless of station are also highlighted and add a lot to the character development and world-building.

I love that the story stresses that women don’t always need rescuing. They are perfectly capable of rescuing themselves. It’s a great message, and it puts a much more contemporary spin on classic fairy tales where the female is generally a damsel in distress who needs a big, strong man to rescue her. Esme is a strong and intelligent young woman, and she proves time and again that she is so much more than expected.

Rory is also a compelling character, and his story has some great nods to Hamlet, which is so intriguing. His journey is so emotional, as he struggles to forgive himself, deals with trauma from the past, and works to free himself from the fairy godmother’s clutches. Like Esme, he is so much more than he seems, and I really enjoyed how he grew and changed over the course of the book.

This is a fun read for anyone who likes fairy tales or fantasy that is not heavy in the romance department. The major characters are interesting, the fantasy elements are fun, and the messages are great. Special thanks to the author for providing me with a copy of the book. All thoughts are my own.


Rating:

Favorite Parts:

  • The messages.
  • The modern twists on classic stories.

Favorite Lines:

Attitude was half the battle in the quest to avoid a fight.

“You’re walking on a knife’s edge, so,” Gregory said. “Take care not to slip lest you cut yourself.”

One thought on “Book Review: The Rogue and the Peasant by Amberley Martin

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